order by phone (Se Habla Español) 1-800-913-6119 | 1-801-214-2997 or Live Chat
APWPART FINDER
My Vehicle Add New
  • Select Year
  • Select Make
  • Select Model
  • Select Submodel
  • Select Engine

Shop by Brand

Brake Shoe Set

We have 1,898 Items for Brake Shoe Set In-stock.
OR

Your cheap and second-rate brake shoe set may look tough and sturdy, but when exposed to tremendous heat, it hardens like a rock that you can hardly use it anymore. It can no longer stop the rotation of your brake rotor, which greatly impairs the operation of your entire brake system. Soon enough, your brakes will break down and stop working. And when that happens, your vehicle won't even stand a chance in surviving the streets or highways. The only road you can take is the road to deadly accidents and disastrous car collisions! So if you don't want to throw your life away with a substandard brake shoe, get a new one immediately. You can get a high-quality yet reasonably priced brake shoe set here at Auto Parts Warehouse where we offer nothing but the best auto parts and accessories for your vehicle needs! With our huge discounts and free shipping promos, you can definitely save a fortune! And if you have any questions feel free to call us up and our friendly customer service team will tend to your concerns right away! To place your order, just browse through our comprehensive catalog, then select your most needed item and after a few clicks, it's yours! Where else can you enjoy online shopping but here at Auto Parts Warehouse! So don't wait and buy yours now!

Buying Guides
  • Share on Google+
  • Pin It

Choosing the Right Brake Shoe Set to Buy

You're clearly the smart kind of shopper if you're reading this guide-safety is too precious a thing to leave to chance. A brake shoe set is a deeply integral component of brakes in most modern cars and are most responsible for bringing your vehicle to a stop when you engage the brakes. In this guide you will find all the information you need to get a good set for your ride.

Which brakes?

There are two kinds of braking systems out there: drum and disc brakes. They function exactly the same way, in principle. The difference that is important for you to know right now is that you will only need a brake shoe if your ride runs on drum brakes. You can tell that easily because calipers on a disc system are far larger and bulkier. Brake shoes are slender and semi-circular.

Does one size fit all?

"Yes and no" is the unfortunately confusing answer. You see, these are fairly standard in size-that much is true. The problem lies in the specific attachment points-the variation is very slight with an odd screw and bolt out of place, but significant enough to warrant careful research. If possible, consult the manual for your vehicle or for the currently installed brake shoe.

Chances are good that it will have an 8-digit OE number. If you find that out, it's a simple matter of refining your search to brake shoes that are specific to that number!

Performance or replacement?

The difference between high-end performance brake shoes and those more affordable replacements can run between $20-30, so it's an important question to ask. Well, it all boils down to what kind of performance do you need? If you're a die-hard, rough-and-tumble racer then, by all means, go for the performance sets. If you honestly just want brake shoes that get you through the day, there is simply no way to justify spending too much when a replacement is more than adequate.

Repair Guides
  • Share on Google+
  • Pin It

Changing Out Those Worn-Out Brake Shoes

Brakes are life in an automobile and, with the central role they play, so are brake shoes. With a couple of tools, a little patience, and this guide, you can do what you will normally spend a lot on-replace the brake shoes on your vehicle.

Let's get to it.

Difficulty level: Moderate

Stuff you will need:

  • Your vehicle's owner's manual
  • Replacement brake shoe set
  • Replacement shoe hardware-return springs, hold-down springs and pins
  • Jack
  • Jack stands
  • Lug nut wrench
  • Hammer
  • Screwdrivers
  • Cleaning spray
  • Pry bar
  • Brake spoon
  • Brake shoe pliers
  • Penetrating spray [optional]
  • Drum micrometer [optional]

Step 1: Disengage the negative terminal of the battery, and let the vehicle to sit for at least half an hour before starting work.

Step 2: Lift the rear end of your vehicle carefully, and position the jack stands in a secure position.

Step 3: Using the lug nut wrench, loosen and remove the lug nuts and then the wheel.

Step 4: Remove the drum slowly.

*Note* Depending on your vehicle, the drum may be attached in different ways. Here is where your vehicle's manual comes in handy-always refer to it. If any part is rusted over, apply some penetrating spray!

Step 5: Take time to look over the drum for damage-surface cracks, scoring, unevenness.

*Note* Make a mental note of the method of attachment for the brake shoe that you are currently replacing to make it easier to do the same procedure of the other side.

Step 6: Carefully remove the hold-down spring on the secondary shoe-commonly the smaller of the two-you might need to hold down the parking brake actuator to do so.

Step 7: Firmly press the hold-down pin flush against the backing plate, and place the brake shoe retaining spring tool onto the spring's face and turn.

Step 8: Remove the return springs with the brake shoe pliers.

*Note* Normally, you will find three: two up top and one at the bottom-always refer to the manual for the specifics for your vehicle.

*Note 2* If your vehicles has a self-adjuster cable, remove that too!

Step 9: Now remove the hold-down spring on the primary shoe this time, repeating the steps from 6-8.

Step 10: Remove the brake shoes themselves.

Step 11: When you confirm that the replacements are a match, install the new pair of brake shoes-reversing the steps and reattaching all that you have taken out.

Step 12: Reassemble the rear brakes by reversing the relevant steps as well. If you can, replace the old return springs and hold-down springs and pins with new ones to maximize service life.

Step 13: Lower the car once the wheels are reattached, reconnect the battery, and take your vehicle for a slow drive to test things out.

Safety tip: Always use the minimum in safety gear-goggles for the eyes, gloves for the hands, and closed-toed shoes for the feet.