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Door Hinge Pin

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Every hinge relies on a pin to provide the pivot point for the two surfaces it is attached to. When your car's Door Hinge Pin is damaged, bent, or has rusted over, the hinge won't be able to move freely. You'll end up with a door that is difficult to open-if you can get it to open at all. What you need to do is replace the affected pin to restore the proper swinging action of your car's doors. Door Hinge Pin replacement kits are available on the market, and they provide all the necessary hardware you'll need to get a new hinge pin in. These kits contain one pin of a particular specification and a set of corresponding bushings. Many hinge pins come with limited lifetime warranties, so you won't have to worry about defects and premature failure ever again. You can get your Door Hinge Pin from us here at Auto Parts Warehouse. All you need to do is to search our catalog for a hinge pin compatible with your ride's door hinges and browse through the options. Aside from making your shopping experience as optimized as possible, we also make sure that you get the biggest savings. We have the lowest prices for quality parts and accessories, and we even match competitors' prices if you ever find the item you want being sold cheaper at another online store. Order now!

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Easy Door Hinge Pin Replacement

Door hinge pins play a major role in keeping your car's door attached to the body. As these pins get old, the connection loosens and the door begins to sag. This results to difficulty in opening and closing doors. Force it, and you might end up damaging the frame and body of your car. To avoid such problems, replacing these hinges is a must that any home mechanic can do.

Difficulty level: Easy

Tools needed:

  • Masking tape and duct tape
  • Large cloth
  • Jack stand
  • Pry bar
  • Hammer
  • Punch
  • Replacement door hinge set (may include replacement bushings)
  • Vice grip
  • Door spring compressor
  • Lubrication.

Step 1: Park your car and engage the handbrake.

Step 2: Lay strips of masking tape along the edge of the door and the fender. Top it with duct tape afterwards. This is done to protect the paint job from possible scratches and dents.

Step 3: Open the door and support with a jack stand. To prevent scratching the paint job, put a large piece of cloth on the stand.

Step 4: With the door open and supported, use a pry bar to pull out the "hold open" spring, usually located under the top hinge.

Step 5: Remove the bottom hinge upward with a hammer and punch. Make hits strong enough to nudge the hinge out, but not too strong to damage the door itself. Do the same with the top hinge, only this time, punch it down.

Step 6: Some car's bushings can be replaced. To do this, remove the old bushings using the punch and hammer. Next, start the new bushing in the hole with vise grips. Once started, fully insert it with the punch. Again, make sure to not damage the door when applying force.

Step 7: Insert the new hinge pins in the way the original pins were oriented. Secure the top with the lock ring.

Step 8: Return the "hold open" spring with the help of the spring compressor.

Step 9: Finish the job by removing the tape and releasing the jack stand. Apply lubrication on the new hinges.

The entire job can take about 45 minutes.

Tips:

  1. After removing the last hinge, the door might lean on its side. If possible, tie it to the ceiling with a cord, or ask a helper to support the door.
  2. Avoid damaging any electrical parts you may see while working on the hinge. Damaging these can be too costly.