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Front Shock Absorber

We have 6,086 Items for Front Shock Absorber In-stock.

Don't you just hate it when you get thrown all over the seat each time your vehicle goes over humps and potholes? If this is the case with your car, you need to check on its suspension system. Most likely, it has a broken Front Shock Absorber. Although you can repair your shock absorber, it'd be better if you just replace it with a new one. This way, you're assured that the new shocks will effectively dampen the shock impulse by dispersing the right amount of kinetic energy. So no matter what type of terrain you drive on, you're always assured of a comfortable and relaxing ride. That way, you wouldn't have to worry about having you and your passengers getting bruised whenever you go for a ride. However, an important thing to remember when installing a new shock absorber is its precise placement. It has to be properly and accurately installed between the vehicle's frame and the wheels. Shock absorbers come in a variety of designs. But the most popular is the hydraulic type because it provides excellent performance, since it can dissipate energy more efficiently. Now if you're looking for a replacement for your damaged Front Shock Absorber, you don't need to look far because Auto Parts Warehouse offers a wide array of selection. We sell this and more high-quality items at very affordable prices—not to mention the discounts that go along with it. So don't wait! Check out our online catalog and get one today while our supplies last!

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Date Published: July 30,2014

Tips to Bear in Mind when Choosing a Front Shock Absorber

Purchasing a new set of front shock absorbers can leave you in a daze. With the many options available, you’ll surely be confused as to which one will fit your ride well and will address your needs perfectly. To avoid making a wrong purchase, here are some tips to consider when choosing a shock absorber:

Make sure to check your car manufacturer’s guidelines.

Since the front shock absorbers are crucial in your ride’s performance, it is important that you consult your owner’s manual first before you head out or get online to purchase replacement. The front shock absorber may vary per vehicle year, make, and model and the type of shocks required by your ride will always depend on its suspension set up. A regular passenger vehicle is usually outfitted with a twin-tube shock absorber while a high-performance or off-road ride may require monotube or gas-charged shocks.

Consider the type of driving you do as well as your driving habits.

If you’re a day-to-day driver and off-roading isn’t your thing, you’ll surely be fine with twin-tube shock absorbers. They are cheaper than most high-performance and more-advanced options, but that doesn’t make them less capable of absorbing road bumps and keeping your tires firmly planted on the road.

A driver who always wants to travel like a bullet or runs at higher speeds can go for a mono-tube or a gas-pressurized front shock absorber. Racing enthusiasts, on the other hand, can go for a set of bypass shocks or, at least, a set of reservoir-type shock absorbers.

Medium-speed drivers or those who run at a speed of more than 20 miles per hour will see great benefits in upgrading their stock shocks to a mono-tube or reservoir-type shock absorber, provided that the vehicle’s specifications allow such upgrade.

Choose a front shock absorber that includes a good warranty.

Good warranty coverage is very important especially for major auto components like the shocks. The warranty will cover those shock absorbers that are faulty or those that fail within a specified period. The manufacturer or merchant should provide you with the option to ship the part back to them and should give you a replacement for the faulty part.

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Date Published: July 30,2014

DIY: Front Shock Absorber Replacement

Even if you don’t drive on bumpy terrains often, your front shock absorbers will wear out after some time. It’s a good thing that even if the process of front shock absorber replacement seems lengthy, an average DIYer like you will be able to pull the task off on your own.

What you’ll need:

  • Jack
  • Vise grips
  • Jack stands
  • Lug wrench
  • Wheel chock
  • Socket wrenches
  • Combination wrenches
  • New front shock absorber

Step 1: Prepare your ride by parking it in a solid, level surface. Loosen the wheel’s lug nut using a lug wrench.

Step 2: Position the wheel chocks behind the rear tires. Raise the front of your car using a jack, making sure it is positioned under the vehicle’s frame and not beneath the car’s suspension system.

Step 3: Secure the raised part of the vehicle by placing jack stands under the frame. Remove the wheel.

Step 4: Loosen the lower attachment bolts and nuts of your old shock absorber, take them out, and set them aside. Take hold of the shock absorber piston using a set of vice grips.

Step 5: With a wrench, loosen and remove the piston rod’s upper attachment nut. Once released, remove the old shock absorber.

Step 6: Prepare the replacement front shock absorber by placing a grommet on the piston rod, making sure the convex side is facing up.

Step 7: Position the rubber bushing on the piston rod and carefully push it down until it is seated well on the grommet. With the convex side down, slide the second grommet on the piston rod of the shock absorber. Make sure it sits well on the rubber bushing.

Step 8: If the new front shock absorber comes with a plastic strip around the shock, you have to remove the plastic. This is usually placed by some manufacturers to prevent shock compression during shipping.

Step 9: Install the new shock absorber between the upper and the lower suspension arms and push the piston rod through its holed slot in the upper suspension arm. Secure the piston rod by tightening the upper nut.

Step 10: Compress the shock with slow and gradual pressure. Do not stop until the shock’s bottom is aligned with the mounting holes on the lower suspension arm.

Step 11: Slide in the bolt at the lower mounting holes and screw in the nut onto the bolt.

Step 12: Put back the wheel and tighten the lug nuts. Lower the vehicle and screw in all the lug nuts one quarter of a turn.