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Fuel Pump

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A clogged fuel pump will affect your car's performance and fuel economy in no time. If your fuel pump has gone kaput we sell high quality replacement pumps that meet or exceed OEM specifications. What's more, we sell all of our fuel pumps for much less than the regular retail rate so you can save a lot of money. There is no need for you to buy from your dealer's parts department or to have your dealer install the new part. That gets to be expensive. You can do the job yourself and save big money. Find the part you want right online and we will ship it to you right away. Our prices are low because we only buy direct. This assures you that our prices are low and the parts that we sell to you are authentic. No third party price mark ups, just indisputable every day low prices. Shop anytime for fuel pumps as our store never closes. We have what you want, when you want it, at prices that are the lowest in the business. If you cannot find the fuel pump you need, we have online assistants standing by ready and able to help.

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How to Get the Right Fuel Pump

Both carbureted and fuel-injected engines require the use of a fuel pump to get fuel into the combustion chamber. They each use a different kind of pump, though. Carbureted engines use a mechanical pump while fuel-injected engines use an electric pump. In both cases, the pump will eventually fail and will have to be replaced.

Read on to find out how to get the right fuel pump for your car.

What's the job of the fuel pump?

The main purpose of the fuel pump is to make sure that fuel is delivered from the gas tank to the engine's combustion chambers.

In a carbureted engine, the carburetor creates a vacuum that draws the fuel-air mixture into the engine. This same vacuum draws fuel from the tank and into the engine's cylinders. Since this vacuum is not always enough, a mechanical pump driven by the engine helps bring fuel from the tank to the engine.

In an electronically fuel-injected engine, an electric pump sits by the fuel tank. It is controlled by the engine's computer and carefully pumps out a specified amount of fuel from the tank to the engine.

How to know if your fuel pump is going bad?

There are several signs that could mean that your fuel pump is going bad, but the biggest one is when the engine dies and fails to restart. Basically, the car will act as if it has no fuel even if its gas tank is still filled.

Other signs include losing power when pulling away from a standing stop, losing power when the engine is under high strain, and a misfiring engine.

What to look for in a new fuel pump?

One of the first things you have to check is whether the pump is mechanical or electric. You probably know what type of engine your car has, so you also know what kind of pump it uses.

We suggest that you check the specifications of the fuel pump that your vehicle uses to make sure you can get one that completely matches them.

Of course, there's also the matter of size. The right fuel pump must perfectly fit once it is installed in your vehicle.

We recommend that you get only products from established brands. This way, you can ensure the quality and reliability of the product. Read reviews to find out which fuel pump is the best, compare prices, and get the one that will give you the most bang for your buck.

Repair Guides
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Easy Fuel Pump Installation Tips for the DIYer

A bad fuel pump will starve your engine of fuel and will make starting it extremely difficult. This is why you must immediately replace a busted fuel pump.

Here are the steps to follow and tools to use to replace your old fuel pump.

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Tools that you'll need:

  • Socket wrench set
  • Open end wrench set
  • Philips head screwdriver
  • Flat head screwdriver
  • Fuel container
  • Fire Extinguisher

Reminders:

Work in a well-ventilated area and be sure to have a fire extinguisher close by.

You will deal with several screws and bolts in this project. Set them aside in a safe place while working. You wouldn't want to lose any of them.

Make sure that the problem is indeed the fuel pump and not some other part, such as the fuel pump fuse, the fuel filter, or the fuel lines.

Note:

The following steps are for electronic fuel pumps only.

Step 1: Release the pressure from the fuel lines. Find the relay or fuse that controls the fuel pump. Start the engine and remove the fuse or relay. The engine will quickly die after it has used up all of the pressurized fuel still in the lines. Disconnect the negative battery terminal after the engine dies.

Step 2: There are two types of electric fuel pump setups, namely, the under-the-car setup and the in-tank setup. If your pump is under the car, go to step 3A. If it is the in-tank variety, go to step 3B.

Step 3A: Raise the car and secure it using jack stands. Slide underneath and follow the fuel lines toward the fuel tank. The pump should be somewhere in front of the tank. Unbolt the pump and let it drop slightly.

Step 3B: Look for the access point to the fuel pump either underneath your backseat or under the carpet in your trunk. Pop it open to reveal the pump.

Step 4: Disconnect the fuel lines from the fuel pump. Make sure you have a pan or container to catch any fuel that may still be in the fuel lines. Once disconnected, gently remove the pump and move it away.

Step 5: Install the new pump. Reconnect the fuel lines and put everything else back in place in reverse order.

Once you've put everything back in place, fill up the gas tank and start the engine to test the new pump.