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Fuse Box

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Your ride is outfitted with different electrical parts so it sure has electrical circuits that are all routed through a fuse box. This container with a removable cover houses fuses to keep things a little less cluttered. It is usually positioned under the dashboard, just in front of your left knee, if you're in the driver's seat. When you open the cover of the box, what you'll see is a row of various colored fuses nicely arranged inside. Since fuses have electrical connections, they are more prone to corrosion, which reduces the efficiency of your ride's electrical system. Due to moisture, rust can build up on the connections and in some areas of the fuse box. When this happens, the best thing you can do is to clean the said box. You can use a small wire brush to rid each connection of dust, dirt, and moisture. Just make sure that you disconnect the battery first before doing anything to clean the corrosion. However, if the damage can no longer be repaired, then you don't have a choice but to replace your fuse box with a new one. Good thing, we are now here to supply you with even the hardest-to-find vehicle components in the industry. We have thousands of auto and truck parts and accessories in stock so we sure have whatever it is that your ride needs.

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How to Shop for the Right Fuse Box

If you are the type who loves blasting music through the car radio, pimping the exterior using LED lights, and adding other modern features to an old vehicle, you've got to start looking for a new fuse box that can handle the upgraded electrical requirements. Having trouble finding the right one? Don't worry; this guide right here will definitely make the search a lot faster and easier.

Tip no. 1: Before shopping for a fuse box, make sure you know the specs.

You can refer to the owner's manual, ask your car manufacturer, or simply surf the internet to get the information you need. Here are the things you have to know before you start to shop:

  • Fuse Box Types

    • Blade type fuse boxes are commonly used in modern automobiles; however, not every box suits all makes and models. Find out the number of its terminals; is it a 4-way, 6-way, or 8-way box? Check the blade size and fuse type. What type of blade size can it handle? Can it carry a set of low-profile mini, mini, regular, or maxi fuses?
    • A Bosch fuse box type is often found in old makes and models (often they are European vehicles). It can be a 2-way or a 4-way fuse box.
    • A Lucas fuse box, on the other hand, just might be the replacement you need if you are upgrading a vintage British-made automobile. This fuse box is not very common; however, you just might find one in stores that specialize in parts for old automobiles.

  • Amperage and current limitation

    Fuse boxes have diagrams that specify the type of fuse they carry and the total amount of amperage they can hold. Check if the product matches the specs written in the diagram of your original fuse box.

  • Exact fuse box dimensions

    Measure the original box's length, width, and thickness. This can vary for every make and model.

Tip no. 2: Compare prices and product features.

Fuse box prices may range to something as low as $5 to something as expensive as $400. However, before going for a high-end or low-end box, make sure you compare the features of the items. Some features are:

  • Installation and design

    Unlike typical fuse boxes, some products possess a special design that makes installation and creation of circuits easier. If you're a DIYer, you'd prefer easy-to-install boxes.

  • Material

    Is it made of thermoplastic, ceramic, or glass fast? Some boxes can be more expensive than others because it is made of more durable and specialized materials.

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A Quick Guide to Replacing Your Fuse Box

You were driving smoothly in the highway when suddenly your headlights went out, the radio stopped working, and your doors' power locks got stuck. If you've checked your fuses and relays and none of them blew out, don't worry; you are not being haunted by ghosts-your vehicle's fuse box just might need replacing. In case you encounter any of these signs and symptoms while driving, replace your old fuse box right away. Here is a short guide to help you out.

Difficulty: Moderate

Things you'll need:

  • Flashlight
  • Plug puller
  • Owner's repair manual
  • Ratchet wrench
  • Socket set (1/4 inch)
  • Socket extension (1/4 inch)
  • Screwdrivers
  • Felt pen
  • Rags
  • Masking tape

Steps:

  1. Turn off your ignition and disconnect battery cables to avoid electrocution. Wrap the cable ends in rags to keep them from being in contact.
  2. Locate your fuse box using the owner's manual. Some cars have fuse boxes under the dashboard or under the hood. Most of these have covers have diagrams of the circuits they control; use these diagrams to find out which of the fuse boxes needs replacing.
  3. Look for the battery supply cable; it is usually a large red cable or a set of cables attached to the fuse box. If they are attached on top of the fuse box, get the small socket and ratchet to unscrew the nuts. Wrap the detached wires in masking tape and use the felt pen to mark them according to the diagram.
  4. If there are other cables around the fuse box, remove them one by one using the small socket. Use the masking tape and felt pen to mark them as well.
  5. Grab your new fuse box. If it doesn't have fuses yet, use the plug puller to gently remove the fuses out of the old box and place them in the corresponding slots in the new box. Hook up the cables you detached; follow the diagram and the marks you left on the cables.