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Parking Brake Cable

We have 928 Items for Parking Brake Cable In-stock.

Most car owners with automatic transmissions more often than not neglect to use the hand brake also known by other names: emergency brake, parking brake or e-brake when they park their vehicles. They have this idea that the gear shift is sufficient to hold the vehicle in place. What they failed to understand is that the parking brake is required to activate the rear braking system which in turn keeps the rear brakes adjusted. Failure to use the parking brake can lead to corrosion and rust build up on the parking brake cable and the equalizer linkage resulting to its failure to function in case additional braking is required. To fix this problem you would need the following tools: car lift, hand wrench set, impact gun, impact sockets, ratchet and socket set, and anti-seize lubricant compound. Also depending on the wear or damaged on the parking brake cable you might also want to consider replacing it with a new one. Remember the braking system of your vehicle is one of its safety features and safety should never be compromised. Replacing the brake cable usually takes a few minutes depending on your knowledge of the task at hand. If it's your first time it is always best to get hold of a repair manual to guide you. As for the parking brake cable you may check out our vast inventory of high quality brake cables. We also have 24/7 technical support to answer your queries and assists you on your purchase.

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Choosing a Parking Brake Cable

Whether you own a heavy-duty truck or a lightweight compact, you'll have to replace your vehicle's parking brake cable after some time. Should this cable snap, then you won't be able to park your vehicle safely, especially when you live in a hilly location. You wouldn't want it to start barreling down an incline now would you? Replacing a parking cable is quite easy, but you'll have to get a top-quality replacement that will surely last you for a very long time. You'll also need something that will work for your vehicle, otherwise, the cable could just snap if it can't bear your car's weight. Know what you need so you won't go over your budget by browsing through our short guide.

How Does a Parking Cable Work?

Just like any system inside your car, your brakes rely on all its components working perfectly in order to stop your car from moving. Your parking brake works the same way, except that you pull on your hand brake instead of stepping on the brake pedal. When you pull on your hand brake, the lever engages your car's hydraulic braking system with the help of your brake cable.

Finding a Suitable Replacement

You simply can't go wrong when getting an OEM parking brake cable since it would be designed specifically for your car's make and model. We advise you to check your car's manual as it would have specific details on what cable is suitable for your vehicle. You'd want a strong and durable cable, so you'll need to get products that are made from tough materials like steel. You also need them to last for a very long time, so it's advisable to get cables that have some sort of rust protection in it. Prices vary since cable sizes differ from vehicle to vehicle, but standard brake cables can go for as low as $50 - $100 to as high as $150 for advanced models.

Get What Fits Your Budget

We highly recommend that you get a parking brake cable from a reputable brand that fits your budget. Standard cables are pretty much all the same, and should last for a long time since they are primarily made from metal. If you have extra cash to spend, then you'd want to get cables that are wrapped in protective plastic, or are treated with some special anti-rust compound, since they'll last longer and will be well worth the investment that you paid for.

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How to Replace Your Parking Brake Cable

Over time, your car's parking brake cable would start to loosen or wear out completely. You shouldn't drive your vehicle at all until you get this cable replaced. It's a good thing that it's quite easy to replace a worn out parking brake cable, so you won't have to head out to a mechanic or pay for a hefty repair fee. With a couple of basic tools, you'll be able to replace your parking brake cable in about an hour or two. Go through our short guide and get started right away.

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Tools that you'll need

  • Socket wrench
  • Screwdriver
  • Replacement parking brake cable

Step 1: If your parking brake isn't working at all, then make sure that you place some chocks under your tires to prevent them from rolling.

Step 2: Lift your vehicle up with a jack and secure it into place with a couple of jack stands.

Step 3: You'll then need to loosen the lug nuts on the wheels so you could take the wheels off from your vehicle. You will also need to remove the brake drum from its mount so you could access your parking brake cable.

Step 4: Once you've removed the wheel and brake drum from your vehicle, then you'll be able to locate the cable attachment near it. If you're having difficulty locating this, you'll have to consult your car's manual to help you out.

Step 5: Remove your worn out brake cable and install an aftermarket replacement in its place. From here, you'll have to trace the other end of the cable that's connected to your hand brake so you could attach your new cable into it as well.

Step 6: You might have to work by touch in order to find the other end of your parking brake cable. Move underneath your car and follow the cable all the way under the floorboard under the driver seat.

Step 7: Once you've found the other end of the cable, you should then remove it from its mount on the parking brake mechanism and connect your brand new parking brake cable in its place.

Step 8: Mount your wheels back into place and lower your vehicle safely on the ground. You should then check if your hand brake is working and that it feels nice and tight.

Step 9: It's a long process, so if you have any doubts along the way, you might need to have a mechanic help you out instead.