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PCV Hose Nipple

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In 1952 a professor from the California Institute of Technology at Pasadena has suggested that gasoline powered vehicles were the major contributor of hydrocarbons--a vital component of smog. Then in 1958 GM Research Laboratory has also conducted their own research and found out that the road draft tube was indeed responsible for almost half of the hydrocarbons emitted by automobiles. To solve this problem GM has utilized the PCV valve to reduce hydrocarbon emissions. They later on presented the same solution to the entire US auto industry. The PCV or the Positive Crankcase Ventilation system is designed to remove unburned gases from the engine crankcase as well as control crankcase pressure to prevent oil leaks or seal damage. However there are times due probably to long usage and the neglect of regular maintenance the PCV system is damaged. Some of the indications of a malfunctioning PCV are poor idling, increase in fuel consumption, and such. The common cause of PCV malfunctioning is a clogged or a worn out PCV hose. It is vital that you have it fixed before it seriously damaged the engine. In replacing the hose, it is important that you check the other components attached to it like the PCV hose nipple since it might also need replacement. You may view our large inventory of high quality PCV products for your PCV hose and PCV hose nipple requirements. All of our products are backed by extended limited warranty to give you confidence to shop with us.

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Easy Steps to Replace Your PCV Hose Nipple

So let's say you were changing some cracked hoses and accidentally snapped your car's PCV hose nipple. Question is: What would happen? Your car would not only smell like oil, but it would also lose its vacuum. Without a PCV hose nipple, your engine won't run as efficiently as you'd like it to even with a newly installed PCV hose. Read on and learn the steps to replace a PCV hose nipple and your PCV hose as well.

Difficulty level:Moderate

Tools that you'll need:

  • Pliers
  • Jack stand
  • Ratchet and socket
  • Hose clamp
  • PCV hose
  • PCV hose nipple

Step 1: Place a jack stand beneath the lower control arm of your car and make sure it is secured. You will be working under your car so make sure there is enough space to move around.

Step 2: After locating the PCV system, detach the clutch cables as to avoid damaging other parts. Loosen the hoses connected to the valve. Also locate the PVC hose and then the PVC hose nipple (which actually protrudes from the side of the oil pan).

Step 3: Use a hose clamp to move over one end of a 3/8-inch hose, and push it up the hose so that it does not fall off. Move one end of the long hose over the PCV port tube until it fits the side of the oil pan.

Step 4: Move the hose clamp to the end of the hose near the base of the oil pan. Using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket, secure the clamp between 15 to 20 foot-pounds of torque. Insert the entire tube to the back of the driver's side of the engine.

Step 5: Cast the front of your car down and raise the hood. Find the PCV valve on the back of the valve cover (which is the uppermost part of the engine, directly on top of the block) and join your PCV hose to the long PCV valve by hand.

Step 6: Attach the PCV hose to any plastic clamps or brackets that are designed to hold the PCV hose securely away from the extremely hot parts of the engine.

Step 7: Fasten the upper end of the hose to the nipple on the intake manifold. Do this also on the other end to the top end of the bottom portion of the PCV hose.

The entire process of replacing both the PCV hose and PCV hose nipple can take a few hours. If you have time, check the whole PCV system in case there are other repairs that need to be done.