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Sway Bar Kit

We have 658 Items for Sway Bar Kit In-stock.

Keeping the suspension in excellent condition at all times is a must. This, of course, includes the sway bar since it helps maintain the car's stability when negotiating turns. In case this part becomes defective, it must be replaced immediately. Now, a high-quality sway bar kit is what you need to restore the efficient suspension performance of your ride. If you fail to promptly provide the right solution to a damaged sway bar, chances are you'd be confronted by more auto-related problems in the long run. First off, a damaged suspension can cause your car to suddenly break down. There won't be a problem if this happens while you're within the city limits because you can easily call for a tow truck. But then, it's a different case if your car breaks down in the middle of nowhere. And even if it doesn't break down, you'll surely have difficulty steering and handling, especially if the road is uneven and rough. To put it simply, this means compromising your personal comfort and your passengers' as well. And that should be reason enough to convince you to replace the faulty part immediately. However, always make sure to get a high-quality sway bar kit for the best suspension performance. For premium choices, shop only at Auto Parts Warehouse. The sway bars we offer, which are sourced from trusted brands, have all been crafted to meet-even exceed-customer expectations. Just browse through our online catalog to find the perfect kit for your car. Place an order with us today!

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Picking the Right Sway Bar Kit

Excessive body roll, tire wear, sloppy steering, awful suspension-you can blame all these to an old, stressed out sway bar. Without that resilient spring steel, high-speed cornering and sudden, sharp turns can make your car lean heavily on the other side or even roll over. If you want your ride to stay glued to the road with every twist and turn, then treat yourself to a trusty sway bar kit.

Why is it better to get a kit? And what should be in it?

You can get parts piece by piece-bushings, linkage assemblies, and a new sway bar. But while you can save some cash with this, wouldn't you worry about brackets, bolts, nuts, and other parts on the verge of wearing out? With a kit, you get everything brand new. It's complete with mounting clamps and brackets, bushings, bolts and nuts, links, and, of course, the sway bar. All these bits and pieces will surely fit-you'll know which goes with what. Installation is usually easier, with zero to minor welding or drilling required. Most kits are designed for bolt-on assembly. Some are available not merely as an OE replacement but as an upgrade, making them perfect companions for high-performance spring kits and other suspension parts.

So what's it going to be? A new front or rear sway bar kit?

Most cars come with front sway bars, but not all of them have rear anti-roll bars (you can find these mostly on high-performance models). If you're fed up with the lackluster handling of your ride, you can simply replace the worn-out front sway bar, install a rear sway bar, or get a larger stabilizer bar for the front (a common upgrade for some vintage Mustangs). Whatever you have in mind, don't gamble on a sway bar kit that isn't compatible with your ride-use your vehicle manual as a guide.

What are things to consider when in the market for a solid sway bar?

The sway bar can be made of high-carbon steel, hardened and stress relieved for better support to suspension. It can also be made of 4140 chrome moly steel or high-tensile steel alloy, both cold formed, short peened, and tempered for maximum durability. Your sway bar replacement may come in a light tubular steel, which can be stiffer than the stock but won't add unwanted pounds to your car. The sway bar should be powder coated for high resistance to rust.

Adjustable or non-adjustable?

Adjustable sway bar kits allow you to fine-tune the handling of your vehicle according to your driving style. These have different adjustment positions. But if you're simply looking for a new sway bar for day-to-day driving, a non-adjustable type will do.

What about the bushings?

Stock rubber bushings are softer and may provide more cushion, but performance-driven motorists prefer neoprene types because they're stiffer and more resistant to wear. Polyurethane bushings, meanwhile, combine the elastic quality of rubber and the sturdiness of metal.

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How to Install a Sway Bar Kit

You'll never really know the true meaning of "handling like a dream" without that resilient spring steel (a.k.a. the sway bar) to balance things out and reduce body roll. Tight turns and high-speed cornering? Don't you worry a thing! But if there's rapping or clunking noises and you notice erratic handling coupled with tire tread wear, then here are the steps for replacing the old sway bar:

Difficulty level: Moderate

For the front sway bar

What you need:

  • Front sway bar kit
  • Car lift
  • 3/8-inch-drive air ratchet
  • 3/8-inch-drive universal impact swivel
  • 3/8-inch-drive impact socket set
  • Hand wrench set

Step 1: Lift your vehicle and crawl underneath to see where the links of the front sway bar go.

Step 2: Use the socket, hand wrench, and air ratchet to hold the sway bar link connection, as you take out the link on each side. Depending on the connection of the link to the sway bar, you may use hex-head Allen wrenches and other tools to support the link while removing the retaining nut.

Step 3: Find the sway bar brackets simply by tracing the sway bar end links. For some models, you have to take out undercarriage parts to work on the brackets.

Step 4: With the air ratchet swivel and socket, remove the brackets' retaining bolts. If space is too tight, then use a hand wrench. Now pull out the sway bar.

Step 5: Set the new bushings on the sway bar replacement. After that, you have to change the brackets. Thread the bolts and nuts, but don't tighten them just yet.

Step 6: Hook up the sway bar end to the links and seal the sway bar links' retaining nuts. Now you can tighten the sway bracket's nuts and bolts.

For the rear sway bar

What you need:

  • Rear sway bar kit
  • Tape measure
  • Jack and jack stands
  • 3/8-inch ratchet and socket
  • Open-end wrench set

Step 1: Using the jack, lift the vehicle and secure it with jack stands, so you can slide underneath.

Step 2: Grease the inside of the sway bar bushings. Put these bushings (included in the kit) into the sway bar by pushing it to the bar's middle part.

Step 3: Push the brackets over the torsion beam, the one that's linked to the rear suspension. Once they're sealed in place, check if the brackets are spaced evenly from side to side using a tape measure. With the open-end wrench and 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, secure the clamps (with the bolts) over the sway bar bushings.

Step 4: Raise the jack till it's at the bottom of the torsion beam. Then use the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket to remove the bolt/s of the shock. Thread the heims joints into the assembly using a lock nut (in the middle) to put together the end links.

Step 5: Make sure that the threads are halfway out of the collar-use a tape measure for this. Seal the heims joint to the shock hole with longer bolts. The sway bar should be fastened to the other end. See the part of the link that's not threaded? That should be on the bolt of the shock mount.

Step 6: Simply follow the same steps for the vehicle's other side. Finally, take the vehicle off the stands as you lower the jack.