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Third Brake Light

We have 208 Items for Third Brake Light In-stock.

Brake lights are very important components that keep motorists safe. They light up every time the brake pedal is stepped on, as the driver slows down or comes to a stop. Trailing motorists are notified by the light, and they will also slow their car down accordingly. Sometimes, however, motorists don't pay attention to brake lights or their view of the brake lights is blocked. This is why additional warning lights like the Third Brake Light are necessary. This light's function is similar to the main brake lights, only that its location is different. Third brake lights are also known as centre high mount stop lamps (CHMSL) because they are commonly installed high and smack at the center of a vehicle's rear window or deck lid where it's most visible to tailing motorists. Safety is definitely improved with this light in place. That's why third brake lights have been required on cars in North America since 1986. The third brake lights available today come in different shapes and sizes, so car owners can choose one that suits their ride perfectly. Many models in the market come with extra features like chrome finishes, cargo lights, or platinum smoked lenses. Installing a new Third Brake Light is easy because most come in a direct-fit design with plug-and-play wiring. Splicing the wires is also not required. When it comes to top-quality third brake lights, there's only one place to trust—Auto Parts Warehouse. Need one? Place an order now to avail of our huge discounts!

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Tips for Buying a Third Brake Light

This small, inexpensive component can save your life. Third brake lights, also known as center high mount stop lamps, have been mandatory safety items in North America since 1986. Often situated higher than the other two side brake lights and right in the middle of a vehicle's rear window or deck lid, third brake lights notify trailing motorists whenever you step on the brakes. Studies conducted when these brake lights first came into widespread use found that rear-end collisions were reduced by an astonishing 50%! With such an important role in your personal safety, you should replace your third brake light right away when it burns out.

Here are some points to consider when buying a third brake light:

  • Make sure that the third brake light you get is ""street legal"" in the sense that it meets all the standards and regulations enforced by the US Department of Transportation (DOT). You can do this by checking the specifications of the brake light and comparing them to your state's required specifications, visiting the manufacturer's website and checking if the component is DOT approved, and testing it right after installation.
  • Be wary of fake or counterfeit brake lights. Some of the marks of a counterfeit product include bad grammar and misspellings on the packaging, incorrect contact information provided, and the absence of any indication that it is DOT approved. Do not buy such a product.
  • We recommend you get a light-emitting diode (LED) third brake light. This type of brake light is small, consumes less energy, requires little maintenance, and shines brighter than all the other alternatives. An LED is also ideal because of its fast switching time, which means it reacts faster to your using the brakes. It can fully light up around half a second faster than an incandescent bulb-a difference equivalent to an entire car's length at normal highway speeds.
  • See if you can find custom LED brake lights specifically designed for your vehicle. These can add some style as well as safety to your ride.
  • Flashing LED lights are ideal for added visibility. However, make sure it is not flashing too quickly as this may be a hazard for epileptic drivers.

Also, be sure to check your vehicle owner manual for any specifications regarding your third brake light. Keep these tips in mind and you will soon be enjoying a safer, more stylish ride.

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Replacing Your Third Brake Light

Working third brake lights (also known as a center high mount stop lamp) have been required by law in North America since 1986. These are intended to give the drivers behind you ample warning that you're slowing down-especially when their view of the lower two brake lights is obstructed. Early studies found that when third brake lights first came into widespread use, rear-end collisions were reduced by around 50%. This inexpensive component can save you from disaster, and you should replace it right away when it burns out.

Difficulty Level: Easy

Here's what you'll need:

  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Flat-head screwdriver
  • Replacement bulb for your third brake light
  • Owner manual

And here's what to do:

  1. Locate your vehicle's third brake light housing. You can probably access it from the rear package shelf below your rear window or from the upper-rear lining around the top of that window.
  2. Use your Philips screwdriver to remove the holding screws from the brake-light housing. You'll be turning your screwdriver in a counterclockwise direction (rule of thumb: "righty = tighty, lefty = loosey"). Put the screws aside for later use. If there are no screws on your housing, use the flat-head screwdriver to pry the housing up, releasing the holding clips.
  3. Pull the housing a short distance from its mounting surface then remove the light bulb socket by turning it counterclockwise before pulling.
  4. Remove the old light bulb from the socket.
  5. Push your replacement bulb into the socket.
  6. Return the light bulb socket to the housing. Lock it into place by turning clockwise.
  7. Using the same screws, re-attach the brake light housing.
  8. Test your new third brake light. If you don't have anyone around to help you, you can check yourself by turning the ignition key to the "ON", shifting to reverse, engaging the parking brake, then stepping out of your vehicle and coming around to the rear for a look.

Refer to your vehicle's owner manual for any specifications that may require you to deviate from these instructions.