APWPART FINDER
My Vehicle Add New
  • Select Year
  • Select Make
  • Select Model
  • Select Submodel
  • Select Engine

Shop by Brand

Timing Chain Kit

We have 506 Items for Timing Chain Kit In-stock.
OR

There are thousands of parts in your car that need cionstant maintenance. In fact, it can become quite frustrating because there are just so many parts to keep an eye on! However, you must remember that without the right maintenance your car will destroy itself. With wear and tear, every use of your car eats away at something. Leave it unattended long enough and your car becomes food for the junk yard. Who knows, maybe all your car needs at the moment is a new timing chain link. Take the time to look under the hood. Proper maintenance takes time and effort, much like how you take care of a child. So be meticulous. Making sure your car keeps on running for years to come the same it did the first time you drove it does not happen magically. You need to exert your own effort. However, that does not mean you have to do it alone. At Auto Parts Warehouse all your car needs are readily available with the click of a button. Check out our catalogs and search for the timing chain link that fits your car's specific make, model and year. With a few simple steps you can get all your ordered parts in record time, and in one piece.

Buying Guides
  • Share on Google+
  • Pin It

Date Published:

Choosing the Right Timing Chain Kit

Although the chain is far more durable than the rubber belt found on a lot of automobiles, it is still one of the vulnerable points in the engine. This guide will help you to pick out the right kit for your ride.

What's in the Kit?

We could cop out and say: "everything you need for a complete installation", but it always pays to know what you are getting when you buy one-after all, you could opt to buy these parts separately. Here is the basic rundown of what you normally get in the kits on-sale in the market:

  • Camshaft Sprocket. The camshaft controls the opening and closing of the intake and exhaust valves specifically. This sprocket attaches to one end of the shaft and is the anchoring point of one end of the timing chain.
  • Crankshaft Sprocket. The crankshaft controls the upward and downward movement of the pistons within the cylinders in your engine. This is the larger of the two sprockets and is the anchoring point for the other end of the timing chain.

The key thing to look out for when picking out the sprockets is the diameter of the sprockets themselves. Always use your own existing sprockets as a reference and measure out the diameters with a tape measure to be sure. It's always safest to check the diameter you measured against the sprocket you want to get.

  • Timing Chain. The chain is the most critical component in the whole kit because it is responsible for making sure that camshaft and the crankshaft moves in perfect tandem-that, in turn, keeps your engine running efficiently.

Proper length and tension are the two important things to look for in a timing chain. Do not use your old chain as a reference point as it might have experienced some distortion or lengthening in its lifetime-even the slightest slackening of tension can be trouble. The best points of reference are your owner's manual or the result of a year-, make-, and model-specific search for a chain on an online retailer's site.

To Kit or Not To Kit

Apart from the three critical components, there are two very big advantages that come with getting a timing chain kit as opposed to purchasing the individual parts:

  1. You get the right fitting nuts and bolts, among other things, that will save you the hassle of looking for them. This also means that the entire system, when installed, will not be in danger of falling apart due to poorly fit bolts.
  2. It is a smarter investment in the long run because you not only replace and revitalize on component, you get a brand new set overall. That means that you only have to do a single replacement that can last a very long time.
Repair Guides
  • Share on Google+
  • Pin It

Date Published:

Changing Out Your Timing Chain

Without a timing chain, you go nowhere. Because of the danger of it snapping while you you're driving at higher speeds, you should start checking up on-consider replacing-your engine's timing chain after a good 50,000 miles. Replacing your own timing chain is very straightforward, and this handy little guide will have you bragging that you handled it yourself!

Difficulty: Hard

Time to Complete: 2-3 hours

Stuff You Will Need:

  • Timing chain kit
  • Combination wrenches & a torque wrench
  • Socket set
  • Screwdrivers
  • Hammer
  • Silicon sealant
  • Drain pan
  • Pullers ? harmonic balancer and three-jaw gear
  • Thread-locking compound ? such as Loctite
  • Owner's manual

How It's Done:

Phase I: Disassembly

Step 1: Disconnect the battery and allow a half hour to pass before proceeding.

Step 2: Drain the radiator of its coolant.

Step 3: Disengage the upper and lower radiator hoses, all the drive belts, and disassemble the fan and fan clutch assembly.

Step 4: Remove any brackets attached to the water pump at the front timing cover.

Step 5: Detach any hoses that may be attached to the pump and then remove it.

Step 6: With the harmonic balancer puller, remove the harmonic balancer.

Step 7: Detach the fuel pump and any attached lines.

Step 8: Remove the front timing cover.

Step 9: Consult your vehicle's owner's manual to align the timing marks on the gears perpendicularly.

Step 10: Remove any bolts securing the smaller cam sprocket and carefully pull both the sprocket and the chain off.

Step 11: Remove the larger crankshaft sprocket.

*NOTE* On some engines, you might need to use a three-jaw gear puller.

Phase II: Reassembly

Step 1: Put in the new crankshaft sprocket (or the old one if you plan to reuse) and make sure that any markings or dots on the sprocket are facing out.

*NOTE* Never hammer the crankshaft sprocket directly as this can damage it.

Step 2: Install the timing chain then the camshaft sprocket and align properly, referring to your owner's manual as a guide.

Step 3: Secure the camshaft sprocket with the bolts and apply thread-locking compound for reinforcement.

Step 4: Reinstall all removed components from Phase I, taking great care to ensure that all components are where they should be.

Step 5: Reconnect the battery and double-check all connections.

Step 6: Test by restarting the engine, allowing it to reach full operating temperature.

General Tips:

  1. Be safe! Always wear the minimum in safety gear: goggles, gloves, and closed-toed shoes.
  2. Always refer to the owner's manual. The steps are general and may require the manual for specifics.