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Window Crank

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You shouldn't really be surprised if your old window crank broke into two pieces in your hand this morning as you were cranking the window up. Cranks deteriorate over time due to wear and tear, so if you've been cranking on your cranks for years, then there's no wonder why they're falling apart. This might even be the perfect reason to replace all your old cranks as they've probably turned really shabby. Good thing there are many aftermarket window cranks today crafted after OEM specs that'll easily fit your car. These cranks are also made of extremely durable materials, so you'll likely use them for the rest of your car's service life. Here are some tips when removing your busted, old crank. In many cars, the secret to removing this part is by first removing the clip that secures it in place. To get rid of the clip, simply pry the crank with a screwdriver, then insert a cloth in the opening. Next, use a "shoe-shining" motion to force the cloth deeper into the opening to loosen the clip. If you do it right, the click will soon pop out of place and you can go ahead and remove the crank easily. To get the best replacement window crank for your stock, check out our extensive catalog of auto parts and accessories now here at Auto Parts Warehouse. We have over 550,000 heavy-duty auto components that you can get with up to 70% off on regular retail prices! You don't have to get cranky every time you have to deal with your busted, old crank, so order a new window crank today.

Buying Guides
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Shopping for the Right Window Crank

Before power windows were all the rage, vehicle windows needed to be manually rolled down via the use of a window crank. People who opt for manual windows in some newer cars or who drive in older vehicles will know what we're talking about. Picking out a window crank that suits your ride is a simple enough a fair-but there are still a few talking points worth sorting through.

A point on attachment

Fit is not so much a problem per se when it comes to window cranks-they are pretty much the same sizes overall. They only really differ in the way they are attached to the door itself. This is very important to note as these spell the difference between a crank that fits and a crank that you'll have to return at great hassle and expense to yourself.

  • The Slap-On: This type of crank is attached to the door of the car via a notched protrusion. We've called it a slap-on because installation is as simple as a few hammer taps. This surprisingly secure as it is anchored by the bulk and mass of the door itself. You'll know that this is the type that you will need because your handle itself will have no screw attachment points.
  • The Screw-In: This is a much older kind of crank that relies on an old-fashioned method of attachment, the humble screw. Apart from the fact that it uses a much larger and longer screw, the principle is pretty much the same. Some might say this is more secure that a slap-on, but the truth is that they basically work in the same way!

Design considerations

Whether slapped-on or screwed-in, there is standardization within each category-such that you can afford to be a little more creative in choosing the design of the window crank. Tired of just the plastic look, why not go for a metallic one? Just remember that the only limit is how it is attached to your car's door. Everything else is up to you!

Repair Guides
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How to Keep Your Window Crank in Good Condition

There's nothing more frustrating than a window that just won't open. It makes ordering take away, chit chatting with a friend you bump-hopefully, figuratively-into, and enjoying the breeze on the open road, impossible tasks. Your dog probably won't enjoy being unable to stick his head in the path of the on-rushing wind neither. So if your crank is stuck and no amount of jostling gets the darned thing open, this is the perfect guide for you-simple, straightforward, and step-by-step. In 15 to 20 minutes, you should be able to finish the installation.

Difficulty level: Easy

Stuff you'll need:

  • Replacement window crank
  • Philips screwdriver
  • Flathead screwdriver
  • 3-in-1 oil
  • Chamois or, at least, a clean cloth

Step 1: Inspect the crank installed on your car door-some cranks have a retaining screw bolting it down, others are attached in a nut-and-bolt kind of thing.

*NOTE* Also take note of the position of the door handle when it is rolled up all the way up in a closed position.

Step 2: Remove the crank from the door. Depending on the way it is attached, this can mean either unscrewing the retainer or gently prying the handle off by leveraging off a flathead screwdriver at the base.

Step 3: Apply several drops of 3-in-1 oil onto the point where the crank connects to the door-make sure you wipe off any excess that spills onto the door itself.

Step 4:Apply just a drop or two into the connecting area of the new crank. This will help with both adhesion and lubrication.

Step 5: Install the crank onto the door, taking great care to ensure that it ends up roughly in the same position as the old one was at fully closed position.

Step 6: Secure the handle in place by tightening the retaining screw or gently tapping the center of the connector with the heavy end of the screwdriver.

Step 7: Test out the installation by opening and closing the window-slowly at first but gradually increasing in speed to fully test the stability of the installation.

General tips:

  1. It's always better to install a new crank with the window closed as the entire internal assembly of the window is taut and more apt to hold in proper place.
  2. It might seem like a simple task but it still merits the use of standard safety gear: goggles for the eyes, gloves for the hands, and closed-toed shoes for the feet.